ELA

Doodled Blackout Poetry (Composing Poetry: Reading and Writing)

Time Required: One 50-minute session
Skill Level: Beginner
Recommended Grades: 6th to 8th

Students will make a poem based on pieces of published poetry and use the 3Doodler to blackout words and phrases. The remaining words and phrases will be used as anchors to construct new poetry.

Note: Any links outside of the3doodler.com are optional resources. We can’t ensure their upkeep or accuracy.

Knowledge

Students have
  • discussed a teacher-selected poem or text.

  • had practice with a 3Doodler drawing lines, shapes and fill.

Objectives

Students will
  • learn about blackout poetry as a reading and writing activity.

  • practice blacking out a poem with a teacher and a partner.

  • create a blackout poem based on a selected poem or text.

  • use a 3Doodler to highlight, isolate, blackout and decorate a blackout poem.

  • share their blackout poem with the class.

Materials

Students will need
  • 3Doodler (1 per pair)

  • scanned poem or text (1 per pair)

Lesson Plan

Instructions

Step 1 - PREPARATION

Scan one page of a selected poem that has rich and descriptive language.
Printout copies for each pair of students.

Step 2

Project your tablet or computer screen on the board to display the selected poem or text.

Step 3

Share the concept of blackout poetry:

Blackout poems bring new life to written pieces by isolating powerful words and phrases which are used to create a new poem.

Share examples from this Scholastic web page.

You can show them more blackout poetry examples with this Google Search link.

Blackout poetry is also referred to as "found poetry".

Step 4

Define what makes a poem. Note that poems do not need to rhyme.

Step 5

Explain the process of selecting words or phrases for a blackout poem. Share the term "anchor" and its relationship to letters, words, phrases, and/or sentences in this activity. Explain how these anchors are typically composed of metaphors, similes, or parts of a text's descriptive language to create a mood.

Step 6

Model how to use a pencil to draw circles around selected words and phrases first. Read the isolated text as a poem, then select transitional words or phrases to connect the text, e.g., but, next, then, until, finally, etc.

Step 7

Read the new blackout poem. Demonstrate how to make revisions in order to improve the poem.

Step 8

Use the 3Doodler to circle words/phrases. Determine a theme for your new poem and decorate portions of the page with the 3Doodler according to this theme. Demonstrate how to add dimensional objects to the page.

*See image.

Step 9

Hand out a scanned copy of the selected poem or text for students to work on with their partners. Check the students' penciled in work before handing out 3Doodlers.

Step 10

Circle to assist and assess as students work together.

Wrap Up

Students will share their 3Doodler blackout poetry with the class, as well as on Twitter. #3DoodlerEDU @3Doodler

Assessment

The teacher will assess the students' work throughout the activity, as well as by their final blackout poetry, which should create a mood that evokes vivid imagery through figurative language and transitional language.

Possible Extensions

  • Students select their own text to create another blackout poem on their own.

  • Students revise their blackout poem by selecting one word to alliterate by isolating other words in the original text that begin with the same sound, e.g., cup and care.

  • Use students' blackout poetry as writing prompts.

Vocabulary

  • collaboration - to work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor.

  • creative thinking - a way of looking at problems or situations from a fresh and imaginative perspective.

  • figurative language -

  • metaphor - a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable.

  • personification - the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something nonhuman.

  • poetry - literary work in which special intensity is given to the expression of feelings and ideas by the use of distinctive style and rhythm; poems collectively or as a genre of literature.

  • problem-solving - the process or act of finding a solution to a problem.

  • reading - the form or version of a given passage in a particular text.

  • writing - any written or printed paper, as a document or deed.

Educational Standards

Common Core
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.C

Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

In This Lesson

Students will isolate transitional words and phrases to incorporate into blackout poetry.

Common Core
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.6

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.

In This Lesson

Students will use a 3Doodler to isolate and decorate blackout poems according to a theme and an intended mood.

Common Core
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.D

Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

In This Lesson

Students will consider using precise words, phrases, and descriptive details to create a mood in their blackout poems.

ISTE
1C

Use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.

In This Lesson

Students will use a 3Doodler to doodle words.

ISTE
6B

Create original works or responsibly repurpose or remix digital resources into new creations.

In This Lesson

Students will doodle poetry

ISTE
7A

Use collaborative technologies to work with others, including peers, experts or community members, to examine issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.

In This Lesson

Students will confer with a partner throughout the creative process.

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